Before NASA's Cassini flies into Saturn, take a look back at its best images (page 2)

NASAís Cassini spacecraft took seven years to travel nearly 2.2 billion miles to reach Saturn ó but once it got there in 2004, it started taking some breathtaking pictures of the planet, its rings, and many moons. This Friday, after 13 years of orbiting Saturn and making ground-breaking discoveries, Cassini will take a plunge into the planetís atmosphere, where incredibly high temperatures will melt and break apart the probe. The death dive has been planned for years as a way to protect some of Saturnís moon, like Titan and Enceladus, which might harbor life. By destroying Cassini, NASA is making sure the spacecraft ó and the Earth microbes that may have hitched a ride on it ó arenít going to contaminate those alien worlds. In its final... Continue reading…

Cassini headed for Saturn plunge after Titan 'goodbye kiss'

After a "goodbye kiss" with Saturn's huge moon Titan, NASA's Cassini spacecraft should now be on course for its suicide dive into the ringed planet Friday (Sept.

Wed 13 Sep 17 from FOXNews

Cassini Headed for Saturn Plunge After Titan 'Goodbye Kiss' , Tue 12 Sep 17 from SPACE.com

How NASA's Cassini spacecraft will dive-bomb Saturn and die - CNET

NASA's bus-size orbiter will flame out spectacularly after more than a decade of revealing Saturn's secrets.

Wed 13 Sep 17 from CNET Cutting Edge

How to Watch Cassini's Grand Finale at Saturn

Tue 12 Sep 17 from National Geographic

Epic storms, new moons and worlds that might host life: Here are Cassini's greatest discoveries

So long Cassini, and thanks for all the science. Here are highlights of NASA's 13-year-long mission at Saturn.

Mon 11 Sep 17 from L.A. Times

Saturn moon's crazy plume stars in last look from Cassini - CNET

Saturn's moon Enceladus shows off its icy plume one last time in a NASA movie created from Cassini spacecraft images.

Mon 11 Sep 17 from CNET Cutting Edge

Wild! Cassini Probe Spots Weird Waves in Saturn's Rings (Photo)

NASA's Cassini spacecraft captured a spectacular photo of a perplexing wave structure in one of Saturn's rings as the probe headed into its final days at the gas giant.

Mon 11 Sep 17 from SPACE.com

Goodbye, Cassini

Counting down the final moments of Saturn’s epic spacecraft.

Thu 14 Sep 17 from Astronomy.com

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share