Green sea turtle digging its own watery grave due to invasion of non-native seagrass

A seagrass species from the Red Sea is outcompeting the native seagrass species in the Caribbean, where the green sea turtle lives. These iconic turtles are seeing their grazing areas decline, because they have little interest in the foreign seagrass. Wageningen researchers and colleagues from other research institutions discovered how these large underwater grazers seem to dig their watery grave with their own eating behaviour. The Journal of Ecology for this week reports on the topic.

Green sea turtle digging its own watery grave due to invasion of non-native seagrass

A seagrass species from the Red Sea is outcompeting the native seagrass species in the Caribbean, where the green sea turtle lives. These iconic turtles are seeing their grazing areas decline, ...

Wed 18 Jul 18 from Phys.org

Moving fish farms enables seagrass meadows to thrive, study shows

Commercial fish farms should be moved away from seagrass meadows in order for both to thrive in the future, according to new research.

Thu 12 Jul 18 from Phys.org

Moving fish farms enables seagrass meadows to thrive, study shows, Thu 12 Jul 18 from ScienceDaily

Moving fish farms enables seagrass meadows to thrive, study shows, Thu 12 Jul 18 from Eurekalert

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