Replacing some old pipes can still result in lead-contaminated water

Lead in drinking water is a decades-old problem and still poses serious public health risks today. In response, utilities are replacing segments of old lead pipes that are causing the contamination. Surprisingly, researchers report in ACS' Environmental Science & Technology that although partial line replacements can decrease lead levels in tap water, concentrations spike right after line replacement and can remain elevated for months afterward.

Replacing some old pipes can still result in lead-contaminated water

Lead in drinking water is a decades-old problem and still poses serious public health risks today. In response, utilities are replacing segments of old lead pipes that are causing the contamination. ...

Wed 9 Aug 17 from Phys.org

Replacing some old pipes can still result in lead-contaminated water, Wed 9 Aug 17 from ScienceDaily

Replacing some old pipes can still result in lead-contaminated water, Wed 9 Aug 17 from Eurekalert

Partial lead-pipe replacements bring down levels of toxins

Reuters Health - New research clarifies the benefits of having utilities replace municipal lead water-service lines, even when the pipe that enters a home continues to be made of the metal that ...

Wed 16 Aug 17 from Reuters

HALF of black and Hispanic US citizens are dehydrated

Public health professors have been scrambling to identify other communities at risk of chemical poisoning since the lead-infected-water crisis in Flint, Michigan, in 2014.

Fri 11 Aug 17 from Daily Mail

Access may explain some social disparities in U.S. water intake

(Reuters Health) - Black and Hispanic adults in the U.S. have higher rates of mild dehydration than whites, and one reason may be less access to safe, clean tap water, researchers say.

Thu 10 Aug 17 from Reuters

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