Victor Vescovo and the DSV Limiting Factor have found new depths in the Mariana Trench

The DSV Limiting Factor submarine has just yo-yoed its way from the surface to the bottom of the Mariana Trench's Challenger Deep point four times in eight days, breaking a ton of records and establishing itself as a reliable deep-sea elevator with unmatched exploration capabilities... Continue Reading Victor Vescovo and the DSV Limiting Factor have found new depths in the Mariana Trench Category: Marine Tags: Submarine Triton Submarines World Records

Victor Vescovo and the DSV Limiting Factor have found new depths in the Mariana Trench

The DSV Limiting Factor submarine has just yo-yoed its way from the surface to the bottom of the Mariana Trench's Challenger Deep point four times in eight days, breaking a ton of records ...

Wed 15 May 19 from Gizmag

Explorer recounts making the deepest ocean dive in history

Victor Vescovo says he didn't set out to break James Cameron's record of reaching the deepest point on Earth. But that's what he did last month as he went 10,928 meters down into the Challenger ...

Tue 14 May 19 from Phys.org

An Explorer Just Made the Deepest Ever Manned Sea Dive ó and He Found a Plastic Bag

Victor Vescovo ventured 35,853 feet to the bottom of the ocean and found garbage

Mon 13 May 19 from TIME

Deepest-ever sea dive finds rubbish at bottom of Mariana Trench

On the deepest dive ever made by a human inside a submarine, a United States explorer saw something he could have found in the gutter of nearly any street in the ...

Mon 13 May 19 from ABC Science

Mariana Trench: Deepest-ever sub dive finds plastic bag

An American explorer finds plastic waste on the seafloor while breaking the record for the deepest ever dive.

Mon 13 May 19 from BBC News

Deepest dump? American explorer spots plastic garbage in world's deepest ocean

We know Mount Everest is littered with tons of trash. Now we know garbage has also been spotted at the world's deepest ocean depth.        

Tue 14 May 19 from USA today

Deepest undersea dive reveals depths of humanity's filth - CNET

Journey 35,853 feet under the Pacific Ocean and you'll find a plastic bag.

Tue 14 May 19 from CNET Cutting Edge

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