Greenland ice sheet melt 'off the charts'

Surface melting across Greenland's mile-thick ice sheet began increasing in the mid-19th century and then ramped up dramatically during the 20th and early 21st centuries, showing no signs of abating, according to new research published Dec. 5, 2018, in the journal Nature. The study provides new evidence of the impacts of climate change on Arctic melting and global sea level rise.

Greenland ice sheet melt 'off the charts'

Ice core data indicate huge increase, with worse predicted. Nick Carne reports.

Wed 5 Dec 18 from Cosmos Magazine

Greenland ice sheet melt 'off the charts' compared with past four centuries

Surface melting across Greenland's mile-thick ice sheet began increasing in the mid-19th century and then ramped up dramatically during the 20th and early 21st centuries, showing no signs of ...

Wed 5 Dec 18 from Phys.org

No equal to recent Greenland melt in centuries-long ice core

The last 20 years were no natural fluke.

Sun 9 Dec 18 from Ars Technica

Greenland Is Melting Faster Than Ever

The rate of vanishing ice is "off the charts."

Fri 7 Dec 18 from SPACE.com

Greenland Is Melting Faster Than Ever, Wed 5 Dec 18 from Livescience

Greenland Is Melting Faster Than Ever, Fri 7 Dec 18 from Watts Up With That?

Greenland is melting much faster than we thought

Thu 6 Dec 18 from Popular Science

Greenland melting is ‘off the charts’ — It’s unprecedented in the last 400 years, scientists warn

In the past 20 years, Greenland's ice sheet has been melting at six-fold the rate seen before the Industrial Revolution.

Thu 6 Dec 18 from ZME Science

Greenland's ice sheet melt has 'gone into overdrive' and is now 'off the charts'

The melting of Greenland's massive ice sheet has now accelerated, scientists announced Wednesday, and shows no signs of slowing down, according to a new study.        

Wed 5 Dec 18 from USA today

Greenland's ice sheet melting at a rate that is 'off the charts'

Researchers say that if the Greenland ice sheet melting continues at 'unprecedented rates' - which they attribute to warmer summers - it could accelerate the already fast pace of sea level rise.

Wed 5 Dec 18 from Daily Mail

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share