A way to use underwater fiber-optic cables as seismic sensors

EARTH is observed as never before. Satellites track typhoons, monitor volcanic-ash plumes and catalogue the changing ways in which human beings use the land. The sort of high-quality imagery that, a couple of decades ago, was the preserve of spies in rich and powerful countries is now freely available to users of Google Maps. But despite its name, most of Earth is covered in water, and it is much harder to monitor what goes on beneath the waves. In a paper just published in Science, Giuseppe Marra, of Britainís National Physical Laboratory (NPL), proposes to shine a little light into the oceans by co-opting infrastructure built for an entirely different purpose. Dr Marra and his colleagues hope to use the planetís 1m-kilometre network of undersea fibre-optic cables, which carry the internet from continent to continent (see map), as a giant submarine sensor. Dr Marra is particularly interested in earthquakes. The dry bits of the planet are well-stocked with...

A way to use underwater fiber-optic cables as seismic sensors

A team of researchers from the U.K., Italy and Malta has found a way to use fiber-optic cables already on the ocean floor as seismic detectors. In their paper published in the journal Science, ...

Fri 15 Jun 18 from Phys.org

Submarine cables could be repurposed as earthquake detectors

EARTH is observed as never before. Satellites track typhoons, monitor volcanic-ash plumes and catalogue the changing ways in which human beings use the land. The sort of high-quality imagery ...

Thu 14 Jun 18 from The Economist

Underwater fiber-optic cables could moonlight as earthquake sensors

The seafloor cables that ferry internet traffic across oceans may soon find another use: detecting underwater earthquakes.

Thu 14 Jun 18 from ScienceNews

Scientists might soon be able to use underwater cables as seismometers

This could also be used to study ocean noise and sealife migration.

Tue 19 Jun 18 from ZME Science

Seafloor fiber optic cables can work like seismometers

Anything that shakes the cable can be detected with the right setup.

Fri 15 Jun 18 from Ars Technica

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