Evidence suggests Toba volcanic winter was less lethal than thought

Credit: pixabayDuring a volcanic winter, ash as well as sulfuric acid, combine with water to obscure the sun and increase the reflection of solar radiation. The result is that summer never arrives, temperatures drop, crops can fail, and people those lucky enough to have survived the initial volcanic eruption may experience famine and undergo mass migrations.This all happened in 1815 following the eruption of Mount Tambora in Indonesia. The event was rated a 7 out of 8 on the Volcanic Explosivity Index (VEI). Geologists believe that an eruption 74,000 years ago of Toba, also in Indonesia, was 100 times more powerful than the Mount Tambora event. Approximately sixty VEI 8 eruptions have been identified in the geological record, with Toba's rated as being among the most explosive. Evidence for the rock, gas, pieces of glass, and other debris propelled into the atmosphere by the supervolcano have been found in numerous places across the globe. Some of the glass fragments, known as cryptote

Evidence suggests Toba volcanic winter was less lethal than thought

Researchers find at least one human population thrived during a 1000-year volcanic winter. Richard A Lovett reports.

Thu 15 Mar 18 from Cosmos Magazine

Humans 'thrived' after historic Mount Toba eruption

New research shows humans survived the catastrophic Toba eruption, 74,000 years ago.

Tue 13 Mar 18 from BBC News

Come Hell or Supervolcano, Humanity Will Be Alright

Every year or so, a fresh rash of concern about the Yellowstone supervolcano spreads across the internet. While the likelihood of an eruption there remains remote, if the caldera were to blow, ...

Mon 12 Mar 18 from Discover Magazine

Humans thrived in South Africa through the Toba super-volcanic eruption about 74,000 years ago

Imagine a year in Africa that summer never arrives. The sky takes on a gray hue during the day and glows red at night. Flowers do not bloom. Trees die in the winter. Large mammals like antelope ...

Mon 12 Mar 18 from Phys.org

These Ancient Humans Survived a Supervolcano

In South Africa, humans not only survived but thrived during the biggest volcanic eruption of the last two million years.

Mon 12 Mar 18 from National Geographic

The Toba eruption in Indonesia 74,000 years ago was so massive that its debris, including glass shards, likely fell atop a site inhabited by humans 5,592 miles away.

Credit: pixabayDuring a volcanic winter, ash as well as sulfuric acid, combine with water to obscure the sun and increase the reflection of solar radiation. The result is that ...

Mon 12 Mar 18 from Discovery News

Stone Age people in South Africa unharmed by supervolcano eruption

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - A supervolcano eruption about 74,000 years ago on Indonesia's island of Sumatra caused a large-scale environmental calamity that may have decimated Stone Age human populations ...

Mon 12 Mar 18 from Reuters

Ancient humans thrived during a supervolcano eruption

It's an apocalyptic scenario on steroids -- and yet some humans not only survived it but thrived in the process.

Mon 12 Mar 18 from ZME Science

How humans survived the eruption of an apocalyptic SUPERVOLCANO

The Toba super-eruption was the biggest volcanic blast on Earth within the past 2.5 million years when it blew its top on what is now the Indonesian island of Sumatra.

Mon 12 Mar 18 from Daily Mail

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