Kepler's final image

Credit: Getty Images: Ron Miller/Stocktrek ImagesPrimitive life might exist on a large, rocky planet that is relatively nearby Earth, according to a team of scientists who presented their work at an astronomy conference last week.The team says that the planet known as Barnard b or GJ 699 b might have microbes or other simple life in its environment as long as there is a lot of thermal activity within the planet itself. This would theoretically provide enough energy for life to survive. It's an exciting find given that the planet is only six light-years away from Earth, making it one of closest worlds outside of our solar system. There is another potentially habitable planet at Proxima Centauri roughly four light-years away from us, which is also coming under scrutiny. (A light-year is the distance light travels in year, or 5.88 trillion miles (9.5 trillion km). The planet orbits Barnard's star, a red dwarf star that is slightly smaller and cooler than our sun. Like many stars of its typ

Kepler's final image

On October 30th, 2018, after nine years of faithful service, the Kepler Space Telescope was officially retired. With nearly 4000 candidates and 2,662 confirmed exoplanets to its credit, no other ...

Tue 12 Feb 19 from Phys.org

Massive star may be the reason Earth isn't a waterworld

The Earth as a habitable planet may be rarer than we thought. Scientists have used computer models to show that the reason our planet and has a moderate climate and isn't an ocean world ...

Tue 12 Feb 19 from Gizmag

From supergiant to solar-mass star: Study finds HD 179821 less massive than previously thought

A post-asymptotic giant branch (post-AGB) star known as HD 179821 turns out to be significantly less massive than previously thought, according to a new study. Using new data from ESA's Gaia ...

Fri 8 Feb 19 from Phys.org

Cosmic pile-up gives glimpse of how planets are made

Astronomers say they have the first evidence of a collision between two planets in a distant solar system.

Tue 5 Feb 19 from BBC News

Giant impacts caused by interplanetary collisions

Astronomers have found fresh evidence for significant planetary diversity within a single exoplanet system, suggesting that giant high-speed collisions are partly responsible for planetary evolution.

Tue 5 Feb 19 from Phys.org

A space rock collision may explain how this exoplanet was born

Simulations suggest a planet roughly 2,000 light-years away formed when two space rocks collided, supporting the idea that such events are universal.

Mon 4 Feb 19 from ScienceNews

Demolition derby: Planet crashes explain different densities

Research sheds light on the violence of exoplanet formation. Lauren Fuge reports.

Mon 4 Feb 19 from Cosmos Magazine

It's an exciting find given the planet is only six light-years away from Earth, making it one of closest worlds outside of our solar system.

Credit: Getty Images: Ron Miller/Stocktrek ImagesPrimitive life might exist on a large, rocky planet that is relatively nearby Earth, according to a team of scientists who presented ...

Fri 8 Feb 19 from Discovery News

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