Oldest stars ever seen give clue to the end of Big Bang dark age

For the first few hundred million years after the Big Bang, the universe was a very cold, dark place. Basic elements like oxygen, carbon and nitrogen weren't very common until the first stars had fired up, burnt out and exploded. Now, astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have detected the most distant – and hence, earliest – signature of oxygen, in a galaxy 13.28 billion light-years away... Continue Reading Most distant breath of oxygen dates back to the Cosmic Dawn Category: Space Tags: ALMA Big Bang Theory Galaxy Oxygen Stars Telescope Related Articles: Metal-poor galaxy could help test the Big Bang theory 13.6 billion-year-old radio signals date back to Cosmic Dawn Aluminum oxide coatings move like liquids to combat corrosion Mysterious black ho

Oldest stars ever seen give clue to the end of Big Bang dark age

Stars that shone just 250 million years after the universe began take astronomy closer to its Holy Grail. Richard A Lovett reports.

Thu 17 May 18 from Cosmos Magazine

Scientists detect oxygen legacy of first stars

The very first stars to shine in the Universe left a tell-tale trace in a far-distant galaxy.

Thu 17 May 18 from BBC News

Most distant breath of oxygen dates back to the Cosmic Dawn

For the first few hundred million years after the Big Bang, the universe was a very cold, dark place. Basic elements like oxygen, carbon and nitrogen weren't very common until the first ...

Thu 17 May 18 from Gizmag

Researchers Close In On Birthdate of First Stars

The Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) is not your standard, run-of-the-mill telescope. Instead, ALMA, which is located in the high-and-dry Atacama Desert of northern Chile, ...

Wed 16 May 18 from Discover Magazine

Scientists see surprise oxygen signal deep in the universe, suggesting stars formed far earlier than we realised

'We are getting closer to directly witnessing the birth of starlight'

Wed 16 May 18 from The Independent

Astronomers find evidence for stars forming just 250 million years after Big Bang

Not long after the Big Bang, the first generations of stars began altering the chemical make-up of primitive galaxies, slowly enriching the interstellar medium with basic elements such as oxygen, ...

Wed 16 May 18 from Phys.org

The first stars may have formed much earlier than scientists thought

After the Big Bang occurred, there was no oxygen in the early universe. Stars had to be born before oxygen could be created by fusion processes. When these stars died, the oxygen was ...

Mon 21 May 18 from Engadget

Oxygen presence in distant galaxy sheds light on early universe

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - After detecting a whiff of oxygen, astronomers have determined that stars in a faraway galaxy formed 250 million years after the Big Bang -- a rather short time in cosmic ...

Wed 16 May 18 from Reuters

Bookmark

Bookmark and Share