TRAPPIST-1 exoplanets could harbour significant amounts of water

Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechThe seven Earth-size planets around the distant star TRAPPIST-1 are "tugging" on each other as they travel around their parent star. By carefully observing those tugs, scientists were able to gather information about the planets' composition and found that some of the TRAPPIST-1 worlds could have as much as 250 times more water than the amount in all of Earth's oceans, according to a new study. Figuring out the composition of these planets is important in determining whether they could support alien life. But it's tricky to analyze them. For starters, the system is 39 light-years away, and sending a spacecraft there is impossible with today's technology. To put TRAPPIST-1's distance into perspective, a spacecraft at the outer edges of the solar system, like the Voyager 1 probe, would still have to travel for over 73,000 years just to get to Proxima b, which is only about 4 light-years from Earth. Therefore, researchers at the University of Bern in Switzerland have tak

TRAPPIST-1 exoplanets could harbour significant amounts of water

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Credit: NASA/JPL-CaltechThe seven Earth-size planets around the distant star TRAPPIST-1 are "tugging" on each other as they travel around their parent star. By carefully observing ...

Tue 13 Feb 18 from Discovery News

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