NASA sounding rocket instrument spots signatures of long-sought small solar flares

Credit: NASAOne of the biggest mysteries about our sun is why the corona ó as the upper part of the solar atmosphere is known ó can be thousands of times hotter than the surface of the sun itself. Itís as though the air around a scorching, burning fireplace is hotter than the flames. While activity such as solar flares and coronal mass ejections can inject large amounts of energy into the corona, these events are too infrequent to maintain the consistently high temperatures found there. For decades, scientists have been studying the mechanisms of coronal heat generation and transfer in an attempt to understand this phenomenon. While several ideas have been proposed, the leading theory for the last few years has focused on what solar physicists call ďnanoflares.Ē These are tiny explosions on the sun's surface that occur almost non-stop. Nanoflares are a billion times less energetic than ordinary  flares,  and are so small that they canít be observ

NASA sounding rocket instrument spots signatures of long-sought small solar flares

Like most solar sounding rockets, the second flight of the FOXSI instrument - short for Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager - lasted 15 minutes, with just six minutes of data collection. But ...

Fri 13 Oct 17 from Phys.org

Solar research: NASA sounding rocket instrument spots signatures of long-sought small solar flares, Fri 13 Oct 17 from ScienceDaily

NASA sounding rocket instrument spots signatures of long-sought small solar flares, Fri 13 Oct 17 from Eurekalert

FOXSI Flights Could Reveal Why the Sun's Corona Is So Hot

Wed 11 Oct 17 from Discover Magazine

Tiny Explosions May Power the Sun's Blazing Corona

The upper reaches of the sun's atmosphere are thousands of times hotter than its surface, and a new study offers a possible reason for that intense heat: countless explosions from the sun, each ...

Mon 9 Oct 17 from SPACE.com

FOXSI may reveal why Sunís corona is so hot

Small explosions called “nanoflares” may explain why parts of the Sun’s corona can reach tens of millions of degrees.

Tue 10 Oct 17 from Astronomy.com

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