Newfound Alien Planet Is Best Place Yet to Search for Life (page 3)

An exoplanet orbiting a red dwarf star 40 light-years from Earth may be the new holder of the title 'best place to look for signs of life beyond the solar system.' Using ESO's HARPS instrument, and other telescopes, astronomers discovered a 'super-Earth' orbiting in the habitable zone around the star LHS 1140. This world is larger and more massive than the Earth and has likely retained most of its atmosphere. This makes it one of the most exciting targets for atmospheric studies.

Newfound Alien Planet Is Best Place Yet to Search for Life

A newly discovered exoplanet may jump to the top of the list of places where scientists should go looking for alien life.

Wed 19 Apr 17 from SPACE.com

Newly discovered exoplanet may be best candidate in search for signs of life

Transiting rocky super-Earth found in habitable zone of quiet red dwarf star.

Fri 21 Apr 17 from Astrobiology Magazine

Newly Discovered Exoplanet May be Best Candidate in Search for Signs of Life, Sun 23 Apr 17 from SpaceDaily

Newly discovered exoplanet may be best candidate in search for signs of life, Wed 19 Apr 17 from ScienceDaily

This potentially balmy super-Earth makes for a tempting case study in habitability

Can red dwarf planets hold on to their atmospheres long enough to survive the first few billion years.

Wed 19 Apr 17 from Astronomy.com

'Super-Earth' orbiting nearby star boosts search for extra-solar life

Paris (AFP) April 19, 2017 Astronomers on Wednesday announced the discovery of a "super-Earth" orbiting a nearby star which may offer the most promising target yet in the search for life ...

Fri 21 Apr 17 from SpaceDaily

Potentially Habitable Super-Earth is a Prime Target for Atmospheric Study

Boston MA (SPX) Apr 20, 2017 The study of alien worlds is entering its next phase as astronomers amass the best planets outside our Solar System to look for signs of life. A newly discovered ...

Thu 20 Apr 17 from SpaceDaily

Newly discovered 'super-Earth' could host alien life

The astronomers estimate the age of the planet to be at least five billion years

Thu 20 Apr 17 from The Hindu

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